Ductless Heat Pumps

Ductless Heat Pumps


High-efficiency ductless heat pumps, also known as ductless mini-splits, use up to 50% less energy than electric resistance heating like furnaces and baseboard and wall heaters. Plus, ductless heat pumps also provide cooling, meaning a single system can deliver year-round comfort for your home.

Heat pumps heat and cool more efficiently because they transfer heat instead of creating it. This process requires significantly less energy. Ductless heat pumps use this principle to extract and concentrate heat from outdoor air. That conditioned air is delivered inside the home using refrigerant lines connected to one or more indoor “heads,” which distribute the air throughout the home.

Ductless heat pumps can replace or supplement your home’s existing electric heating and cooling system. Extended capacity models are available for homes in particularly cold regions. Compared to a full centrally-ducted system installation, ductless heat pumps are relatively easy to install and can even pay for themselves in savings over time.

Cost, Payback and Incentives

The typical cost for a ductless heat pump is $3,500–$6,000, including installation.

The simple payback period for ductless heat pumps is typically 4–8 years. Ductless systems are anticipated to last 15–20 years.

An incentive of up to $800 may be available.

Check with your local utility for offers.

DHP Installation

Customer Benefits

  • Reduce heating energy use up to 50% compared to electric resistance heating systems.
  • Built-in cooling is an added benefit for homes with electric resistance heat only.
  • Uniformly heat main living area, eliminating hot and cold spots common with some types of heating.
  • Meet heating needs even when outdoor temperatures fall below 32 °F, and 5 °F for cold climate models.
  • Relatively low cost and easy to install compared to a full centrally ducted system.
  • Can supplement existing heating systems.
DHP Remote

Recommended For

  • Homes with electric heating.
  • Homes without ductwork, including baseboard, wall heaters or radiators

Savings start with your utility.

Your local utility may offer incentives for home energy-efficiency upgrades, so you can start saving energy and reducing your utility bills right away.

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